ENTERTAINING AMORALITY: AN ENTIRELY SUBJECTIVE LIST OF SHOWS WE FIND FUNNY

ENTERTAINING AMORALITY;

AN ENTIRELY SUBJECTIVE LIST OF SHOWS WE FIND FUNNY

It seems the world is obsessed with drama, good looking, expensive, long-running drama. Well we’ve got no time for sitting around watching whores and dragons, or to pretend to give a shit about some dicks at a 50s ad firm; we want to put smiles on our faces. We should spend our tiny slithers of panic-and-labour-free time watching things that are fun and weird and celebratory of this Fucking Mess, rather than endure the kind of drama that keeps people thinking that shouting at each other is legit.  Here’s a list of things we recommend for your down time, come downs and zoot breaks.

Workaholics

Working in a call centre would be really shit but if you had your best friends with you and reliable drug dealer on hand, it may just be possible to make it through. Ders, Blake and Adam manage to get through their days with a fine combination of bud, capers and imagination. With the Workaholics gang you’ll learn some lessons in slacking off, how not to make homemade jerky and the true meaning of the mantra ‘LETS. GET. WEIRD.’

The fourth series of this bro-based sitcom has nearly finished airing in the US and its balls are still firmly out. The four friends behind Workaholics are clearly enjoying the larger budget these days, expanding their capers to all kinds of madness. From heisting beer trucks to having cross-town go-kart races, these guys are acting out their blazed fantasies to over a million viewers in the US.

 

Idiotsitter

‘Straight white female attempts to rein in the behaviour of delinquent rich bitch.’ There’s a fine situation for a satirical sitcom if ever we heard one. When Billie takes a babysitting job she doesn’t expect to have to look after a spoilt, criminal woman-child but somehow they form some kind of friendship between debauched behaviour, violence and drug spiking. 

Written by and starring comedy duo Jillian Bell (of Workaholics fame) and Charlotte Newhouse, Idiotsitter brings new life to the tired ‘odd couple’ genre. TJ Miller (Silicon Valley) pops up here and there to lend some weird wisdom and Stephen Root as the useless rich father is fine casting. An exploration of the kind of idiocy that the modern world seems an expert at producing, the show is only 6 minutes an episode so is also a comfortable length for the vacuous Youth of Today.

 

It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia

Sunny is 9 seasons old but it’s come to our attention that people still haven’t seen it and The Gang from Philly have yet to exhaust reasons to caper about being pricks to everyone. The Gang has challenged every topic affecting America today, from racism to the North Korea Situation, whilst entirely serving their wanton selfish agendas. From their base in a Philadelphia dive bar these guys manage find new ways to turn on each other and anyone who stands in their way.

Including perhaps the finest work of Danny DeVito’s career, It’s Always Sunny In Philadelphia is another fine example of great comedy being made by those that star in the thing. Of course there’s more writers involved these days but it’s great for such an incredibly long running series to be the creation of its stars rather than some box-ticking bullshit polluted with canned laughter. Speaking of, it’s not since Friends that a sitcom has made us love a bunch of people despite them all being cunts and including a blatant rapist in their number. The difference is, you won’t get older and think ‘why the fuck was I watching that awful saccharine shite?’

The Amazing Gayl Pile

Enter the dark, weird and haunting world of home shopping with your host Gayl Pile. In this world everyone’s a dickhead and we get to explore the demons of a deeply troubled young man living in the shadow of his mother whilst struggling to sell shite on the telly. Gayl is lost and devoid of identity, a classic tragic comedic figure. Things change for Gayl when a brash, awful Aussie called J.D. Castlemane arrives on set to stir the pot of sadness with his terrible products.

New to the amazing Jash network, this online micro series is wonderfully sad and funny. Check it out if only to hear perhaps the worst attempt at an Australian accent we’ve ever come across. Castlemane not only has a terrible accent that sits somewhere between South African and Kiwi, but he’s also a big fan of bingeing on boxed wine, which is the kind of character we can really get behind.

Review

‘Life; it’s literally all we have. But is it any good?’

Forrest MacNeil is on a quest to review life itself in this spoof TV show in which the public asks ‘what is it like to…?’ Putting his work ahead of the happiness of himself and others, Forrest goes as far as he can with each suggested experience. The challenges run deep into taboo territory when Forrest has to review racism and addiction, but these are friendly tasks compared to reviewing divorce and binge eating pancakes.

The first series has just finished airing and it’s all available online. Review with Forrest MacNeil is actually a remake of Review with Myles Barlow, an Australian production that ran from 2008-2010. The Aussie one is longer and darker from what I can tell, but I’ll have to review them fully to find out which is better. Still, this reworking from Andy Daly, who you may remember as the Principal from Eastbound and Down, gets 5/5 stars from us.

That’s our key recommendations but you should’ve already seen ALL of Trailer Park Boys, especially as it’s on Netflix now, and Adventure Time which is my favourite animation bar none. We’ve also just come across High Maintenance, another online super short series that looks fantastic. If stories of a middle class white weed dealer going about his day sound like your thing, check it out here. This list is not exhaustive and doesn’t feature anything from the UK at all, but I'm not sure whose fault that is. Has British comedy been set back by James Corden and The Inbetweeners? Or are we just not paying attention? At least we’ll always have Ideal.

Enjoy the watch-and-wanks.

WORDS: CRAIG BALLINGER

COLLAGE: LIAM ACHAIBOU